…for health care

The same “Less Stress, Better Health and More Love” booklet is used to improve communication between each member of “The Caring Team” which includes professionals, aides, volunteers, caregivers and patients. as well as their family and friends.

Four  important strategies to improve health outcomes and reduce costs are to:

1) engage patients and caregivers in creating patient or family-centered care plans  or “learning plans” for medical, emotional, social and spiritual needs; 

2) improve transitions of care after hospitalizations;

3) address “end of life issues” such as the use of health care proxies and Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (MOLST) forms); and

4) reduce the turnover of aides and improve the quality of their care. 

 

1: CREATE PATIENT AND FAMILY CENTERED CARE PLANS

At Complete Senior Care, which is sponsoring this program, physicians, nurses, therapists, home health aides and volunteers first learn to create their own “Learning Plan” to achieve personal goals  (see page 2) for each type of wellness.  Then they are in a better position to understand this process, explain it to others, and motivate patients (as well as their colleagues, friends and family) by noting positive benefits they have experienced.

For example, the “Learning Plan” (on page 15)  illustrates how same “learning poem” can help patients and caregivers can become active participants in care planning – and continuous quality improvement for both medical and emotional needs (see …for mental health).  It is also designed

 

2) REDUCE HOSPITALIZATIONS

The  “Less Stress, Better Health and More Love” booklet also teaches well-researched strategies to  improve transitions of care (i.e., reducing the rate of re-hospitalizations) as illustrated below and explained on page 14 of our booklet.

3) PREPARE FOR END OF LIFE

The importance of health care proxies and Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (MOLST) as part of End of Life Care Planning  are also detailed on pages 10 and 11.

4) REDUCE CAREGIVER BURNOUT AND HIGH TURNOVER OF AIDES

High turnover of aides is associated with poor communication with patients and other team members. Research has also shown that aides are more likely to stay on the job if they are involved in care planning.  In addition, high levels of stress have been linked to the turnover of both aides and professionals. (See  Reducing Turnover and Increasing Quality for more details and references.)